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Microsoft Readying Configuration Manager 2007 R3

Microsoft described a few new details this week about its upcoming System Center Configuration Manager 2007 R3 product, which is currently under wraps for testing purposes.

The product will feature an improved power management capability. Microsoft claims that the new feature can help reduce carbon footprints and save money by reducing server power consumption, according to a team blog.

Users will be able to create policies for power settings that reflect the "peak and non-peak schedules" of machines in a system. The management product also will have the flexibility to exempt certain machines from the policy, the blog explained.

Users can graph server power consumption before and after policy settings have been applied and then calculate the savings in CO2 output, according to a video embedded in the blog post.

Other enhancements planned for the release include increased scalability and OS deployment improvements. New details will be released "over the coming months," according to the blog.

Microsoft expects to release Configuration Manager 2007 R3 as a final product by late first quarter of 2010. The management solution is currently undergoing testing under Microsoft's Technology Adoption Program (TAP), with a beta expected by the end of October.

Those who want to test Configuration Manager 2007 R3 before its general release have to join Microsoft's TAP. The survey to qualify as a TAP tester can be accessed at Microsoft's Connect portal here.

About the Author

Kurt Mackie is senior news producer for 1105 Media's Converge360 group.

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