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Tiny Tablet Slice

The prediction that Microsoft will have a scant 4 percent of the tablet market in 2012 at first blush sounded pretty bad. Then I realized that 2012 is this year! With Windows 8 expected to ship in the fall (and IT never willing to buy volumes of anything new) 4 percent in a few short months ain't bad. Ain't bad at all.

Sure, Apple can gloat all it wants. It will outsell Microsoft nearly 20 to 1 this year in the tablet market. That's because Apple already has a product and thousands of apps -- and it is on its third generation.

The Macintosh, on the other hand, is 28 years old, and has only 6 percent of the worldwide market.

I'm not 100 percent sure about Win 8 as a killer desktop or laptop OS. But I am bullish on Win 8 tablets because out of the box they will not just be integrated with enterprise apps, they will have the native ability to run most of them. The iPad, great as it is, can't say that. Virtualization is about as native as Iron Eyes Cody.

What do you think of Win 8 tablets vs iPads? Choose your poison at dbarney@redmondmag.com. And how long did it take to remember Iron Eyes Cody? Did the Sopranos Columbus Day parade episode jog your memory?

Posted by Doug Barney on 04/16/2012 at 1:19 PM


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