Live Looking Livelier

Late last week, Redmond continued its Live PR push, announcing or at least pre-announcing a heap of new consumer products and services.

Microsoft plans to enhance its Windows Live services with new Redmond-crafted tools along with items built by partners such as LinkedIn and Flickr. Microsoft also continues to pump out developer tools for the cloud and Web services -- so many, in fact, that it's actually hard to keep track. And I keep track for a living!

Microsoft really needs to distill this all into one cohesive, understandable strategy -- a tough thing for a company of programmers to do sometimes.

Parallels Gains More Mac Power
Parallels, formerly SWsoft, just enhanced its hypervisor for Macs that lets these Cupertino beauties run Windows and Linux.

Parallels Desktop 4.0 supports a staggering 45 different guest OSes, works with DirectX 9.0, and has backup built right in.

Parallels is a feisty and interesting company, with two lines of server virtualization tools and some cool desktop action, as well. I profiled it a while back here.

Sun Loses 6,000 Watts of Employee Power
Sun Microsystems, one of the few tech companies with true spunk, is pink-slipping some 6,000 workers. That's almost the entire population of the small Massachusetts town I live in.

Sun has been going through a difficult transition. Ten years ago it was like Apple; almost all of its technology -- SunRay, SPARC and Solaris -- were entirely its own. It's transitioning to a dual strategy, hanging on to its unique technology while embracing other technologies (hint: like Windows!).

The Sun layoffs are a pre-emptive strike. It expects business to slump and customers to delay buys, and wants to get ahead of the problem. Every smart business person I know is doing the same. What about you? How are you preparing for what could be an economic tsunami? Give us advice we can use at dbarney@redmongmag.com.

Mailbag: Patch Count Wrong?
For this month's Patch Tuesday, John got way more than the two patches Microsoft announced:

It is curious that the patches that Microsoft sends to the home users seldom matches the number you give. This week I got eight updates to my home computer. No, these were all new. I use my computer daily, and on patch Tuesday, M$ sends me updates that install when I shut down for the day. This week it was EIGHT. That is a lot more than the TWO you warned me about. Do you have any idea why the count is different?
-John

Have an answer for John? How about a comment on anything else covered today? Send 'em all to dbarney@redmondmag.com.

About the Author

Doug Barney is editor in chief of Redmond magazine and the VP, editorial director of Redmond Media Group.

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