Microsoft Tries Giving It Away

Hoping to get a little more competitive in both the enterprise and Web search markets, Microsoft announced plans to give away a brand-new product called Microsoft Search Server 2008 Express. The product is designed to allow users to view a collection of search results spanning external Internet-based databases as well as internal computer systems.

Not everything associated with the technology is free (this is Microsoft, after all). The company also plans to deliver a paid version that will be the functional equivalent of the free product. Company officials said they'll announce pricing for that product when it gets closer to launch some time next year.

The move appears to back up Microsoft's promise to fight Google's dominance in the enterprise search area. In October, Google delivered an update to its enterprise search appliance that permits "social" search. The search giant has also invested in enterprise search, as have much smaller firms such as Autonomy, Fast Search & Transfer and Endeca.

Microsoft will deliver a test version of the Express, or free, product this week with plans to also deliver the finished version early next year.

Posted by Ed Scannell on 11/08/2007 at 1:23 PM


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