DOJ To End Microsoft Oversight?

In preparation for a possible end to the government oversight of Microsoft, District Court Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly asked the software maker, the Justice Department and a group of states to submit reports on the effectiveness of the consent decree. This oversight was initiated as a result of Microsoft being found guilty of antitrust behavior in court, and agreeing to oversight as a part of the penalty in 2002.

In response to the court request, a group of states said in a filing that ending court oversight of Microsoft's business practices in November would not allow enough time to consider the antitrust implications of the new Windows Vista operating system. The group believes that Vista changes the nature of competition, and should be studied as it makes gains in the market.

However, in the DOJ report released Friday, the agency said that Microsoft's antitrust compliance is moving forward smoothly, particularly in regard to Vista.

Has federal oversight of Microsoft's business practices made any difference in the company's behavior? Let me know what you think at [email protected], and I'll file a friend of the court brief.

Posted by Peter Varhol on 09/04/2007 at 1:23 PM


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