Pender's Blog

Blog archive

OOXML Finally Gets the Gold

We're contractually obligated -- OK, we don't have contracts here at RCPU, but if we did we'd be obligated -- to mention the Olympics this time of year, so here you go: Microsoft's Office Open XML format, for which we previously used a sports metaphor to discuss, finally got its gold medal late last week, sweeping away the last few desperate appeals and becoming -- for sure, this time -- an ISO standard.

Oh, sure, the medal ceremony was delayed. In fact, it hasn't even happened yet. The ISO will publish OOXML as a standard in the next few weeks, it says, as long as there aren't any other appeals against it. At this point, further appeals look unlikely, as far as we can tell. So Microsoft should have another medal in its trophy case very soon.

Beyond that, Redmond will have a legitimate claim to "openness," a theme it's been harping on almost as much as NBC has been pushing the (amazing, we must say) Michael Phelps story. Well, the "openness" claim will be as legitimate as any that a proprietary software vendor that still has an awkward relationship with the open source world can make...but OOXML's ultimate acceptance by the ISO will serve as a reference point nonetheless.

We still see this whole episode as a show of might on Microsoft's part in an industry that, with Vista sinking and Software-as-a-Service on the rise, looks less and less like the old-school, Microsoft-dominated world of recent decades almost by the day. Score this one (finally) as a victory for Redmond -- the old war horse that still has some kick left in it yet. (And for the purposes of our Olympic theme, let's just consider that last metaphor to be a reference to the equestrian events. Deal? Great.)

Are you pleased or disgruntled about OOXML apparently clearing its last hurdle? (Hey, there's another Olympic reference!) Sound off at lpender@rcpmag.com.

Posted by Lee Pender on 08/19/2008 at 1:22 PM


Featured

  • Ransomware: What It Means for Your Database Servers

    Ransomware affects databases in very specific ways. Joey describes the mechanics of a SQL Server ransomware attack, what DBAs can do to protect their systems, and what security measures they should be advocating for.

  • Windows Admin Center vs. Hyper-V Manager: What's Better for Managing VMs?

    Microsoft's preferred interface for Windows Server is Windows Admin Center, but can it really replace Hyper-V Manager for managing virtual machines? Brien compares the two management tools.

  • Microsoft Offers More Help on Windows Server 2008 Upgrades

    Microsoft this week published additional help resources for organizations stuck on Windows Server 2008, which fell out of support on Jan. 14.

  • Microsoft Ups Its Carbon Reduction Goals

    Microsoft on Thursday announced a corporatewide carbon reduction effort that aims to make the company "carbon negative" by 2030.

comments powered by Disqus

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.