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Doug's Mailbag: Smartphone Smackdown

Readers cast their votes for their favorite smartphones:

Just wanted to chime in on your iPhone vs. the others post. I own a Windows Phone 7. I went into it pretty blindly after some good reviews. I wanted to try it, as it was drastic enough of a change from the previous Windows Mobile 6.

Previously I used and loved an Android phone. It was a low end model that I put a custom ROM on. It was still a very great phone. It just wasn't as responsive as I'd like. I almost upgraded to a newer Android powered phone, but I kept on with WP7. My wife owns an iPhone. I don't mind it at all. It works. It just isn't as 'friendly' as the WP7 is. It's a great phone, but it just doesn't have the personal touch like the Windows Phone 7 has.

Before my Android phone, I used the older Windows Mobile powered MotoQ. HATED it. I was very leery of jumping back onto the Windows phone bandwagon. But, I did. And I am very happy that I did. The other two phone operating systems aren't bad by any means. In fact, I wouldn't be one bit upset had I chosen an Android phone over the WP7. The only downside to the WP7 phone is the lack of quality apps (and finding apps is difficult -- but that's another story). Android has tons, iPhone has even more. WP7 just passed 30,000 apps. The WP7 can't be rooted to run custom ROMs or 'jailbroken' like the Android and iPhone can be. But, I get a very good experience with absolutely ZERO freezing or rebooting. My Android phone couldn't do that. Neither can my wife's iPhone.

Microsoft pulled an ace with the new Windows Phone 7 (and even better with 7.5 OS). I'm just hoping it gains consumer trust and can penetrate the market and make an impact so it doesn't pull the plug, AKA: Kin.
-Dustin

I have a 17-year-old daughter who was bugging me to upgrade her phone (old Alias) because it just turned two years old (very, very old for a mobile phone). We went back and forth on what model to choose by viewing Verizon Wireless' Web site. I was trying to push her toward an Android for many reasons, including initial cost of phone. She insisted on getting a Windows Phone 7 (HTC Trophy). She is always been very independent and she doesn't like mainstream things. So, I guess, Windows Phone 7 is considered going against the tide??

She uses the Wi-Fi feature to keep her Web browsing minutes low and she said tiles are really easy to use. Unlike a lot of kids, she doesn't see it as a status symbol but an easy to use mobile phone.
-Joe

I have looked at WP7, Android, BlackBerry and iPhone. I own a WP7, an Android and a BlackBerry. They all have their pluses and minuses. First, from a development perspective the WP7 wins. From a user perspective, the WP7 wins most of the battles, with Android only winning with Flash in the browser. The Bing voice search and the Social Media tiles in WP7 are real standouts. In one tile I can see Facebook, Twitter, Windows Live, LinkedIn, etc. I can also post to all of them with one post. In terms of devices, there are plenty of both WP7 and Android. Android does win on having 4G.

The iPhone has one model and I don't like iTunes. I have a Zune Pass and it is great. If you choose to pirate music, then I guess the iPhone would be OK, but buying the recent songs with the iPhone would get very expensive.

Anyway, the iPhone isn't a bad phone but the Windows Phone and Android are both better. If they get the Nook app on the Windows Phone, I can drop my Android all together.
-Michael

Share your thoughts with the editors of this newsletter! Write to dbarney@redmondmag.com. Letters printed in this newsletter may be edited for length and clarity, and will be credited by first name only (we do NOT print last names or e-mail addresses).

Posted by Doug Barney on 10/19/2011 at 1:18 PM


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