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Doug's Mailbag: Farewell to Zune

Readers share their thoughts on the Microsoft media player that is no more:

I might be one of the few, but I mourn the death of Zune. I don't want to have to pick and choose what music to bring with me every time I leave the house, so I need a device that holds at least the 40 GB I've got. And streaming doesn't interest me at anything like today's mobile broadband rates. I guess I could get an iPod, with the added benefit that it integrates with my car stereo, but I find the Zune software infinitely superior to iTunes.
-Dave

I love my Zune 120 -- the hard disk recently died a clicky death but I replaced it. I can't stand Apple products, and the Zune software is far superior. I don't want a single device for everything --if I want to make videos, listen to music and make phone calls, the battery won't last too long, will it? And if my one device breaks, I lose everything? No, not ready for convergence yet. Plus, as others have said, the Zune has radio -- a huge advantage. I think this is a mistake, Microsoft. You shouldn't give up in the face of competition.
- Cam

My Zune HD is awesome. I am disappointed in the decision. I use my phone as a phone -- that's it. I don't want to use it as a music player, etc. Besides, there aren't any phones around that I know of that also have an HD radio receiver in them like the Zune HD.
-Kevin

I have one of the older Zunes. I originally bought it because the iPod did not have a radio tuner at the time and the Zune was $50 cheaper. I still use it every day because I can let it play on my desk without worrying about sucking up the battery on my phone.
-Michele

Share your thoughts with the editors of this newsletter! Write to dbarney@redmondmag.com. Letters printed in this newsletter may be edited for length and clarity, and will be credited by first name only (we do NOT print last names or e-mail addresses).

Posted by Doug Barney on 10/17/2011 at 1:18 PM


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