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ScriptLogic Survey Says...

I had lunch with Nick Cavalancia, vice president of Windows management at ScriptLogic, at Legal Sea Foods near Boston last week. Over fried clams, chowder, lobster rolls and tuna melts, we talked about the market and then moved to a survey ScriptLogic just conducted about Windows 7.

The survey shows what seems to be slow adoption of Windows 7, with almost 60 percent of respondents having no "current" plans to adopt 7. Around 34 percent plan adoption next year. Nick thinks this shows that IT will be using XP and Vista for some time to come.

Many in the press are overreacting, arguing that 66 percent of IT pros will "skip" Windows 7. But as a Computerworld blogger points out, having no "current" plans does not equal "skipping"; that just means people aren't moving to Windows 7 all that soon.

An old friend of mine and Microsoft expert Ed Bott has an interesting take. Bott argues that having over a third of all IT customers adopt a new OS in its first year is pretty dang good -- three times better, in fact, than XP in its first year.

When will your shop make the Windows 7 move and why? Tell me at [email protected]

Posted by Doug Barney on 07/20/2009 at 1:16 PM


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