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Oracle Benchmarks 10G Database on Windows

Oracle launched its Oracle 10G database this week and demonstrated slightly better benchmark scalability than SQL Server on a similar Windows-based configuration.

The newest Oracle run on the Transaction Processing Performance Council's OLTP benchmark (TPC-C) achieved 521,440 transactions per minute (tpmC) on an NEC server with 32 Intel Itanium 2 processors (1.5 GHz with 6 MB of L3 cache). The system ran the 64-bit version of Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition, and had 512 GB of RAM.

A run by Microsoft with SQL Server in April on a similar NEC server hit 514,034 tpmC, making the Oracle run 1.4 percent better in raw performance. The Oracle system was 2.3 percent more expensive per transaction, at $11.77/tpmC, compared with $11.50/tpmC for Microsoft in April. The Oracle price also is based on leasing the Oracle database for three years, while the Microsoft price is based on purchasing the system. (See ENT's earlier coverage of this issue).

Both the new Oracle run and the older SQL Server run are fairly far down the scalability ladder, at ninth and tenth overall on the TPC-C benchmark. Earlier this summer, Oracle and HP set record performance on the TPC-C benchmark using a pre-release version of Oracle 10G and HP's HP-UX flavor of Unix on an HP Integrity Superdome server with 64 Itanium processors. A Microsoft run using a similar configuration scored better on price-performance and slightly worse on raw performance (No. 2 overall).

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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