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Microsoft Unveils Datacenter Application Certification Rubric

Microsoft Corp. today released details for certifying applications for Windows 2000 Datacenter Server. Like other Windows 2000 certifications, the process will be handled by Veritest (www.veritest.com).

Microsoft (www.microsoft.com) will finalize the specifications later this month, but opened a draft paper, allowing developers to get a sense of what demands the testing procedure will make. Testing will open when Microsoft releases Datacenter Server to manufacturers, which is expected to occur this month.

Applications will have to take advantage of new features within Datacenter Server, such as the Physical Address Extension and Address Windowing Extensions, which access memory over 4GB, Job Objects, and 4-node failover clustering support. Additionally, the certification process will include a stress test.

Applications will be tested on 8-way Profusion boxes from Compaq Computer Corp. (www.compaq.com) and 16-way and 32-way Cellular Multiprocessing machines from Unisys Corp. (www.unisys.com). Although other hardware will be certified for Datacenter, these machines should give an indication of performance and reliability.

The Certified for Windows 2000 Datacenter Server logo program follows similar programs for Windows 2000 Professional, Server, and Advanced Server. In the six months since those operating systems were released, Veritest certified more than 100 applications under the logo program. - Christopher McConnell

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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