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Intel Servers Racking Up Big Numbers

Maybe it’s the dot-coms. Maybe it’s the ISPs. Maybe it’s companies preparing for a Windows 2000 migration. Whatever the reason, Intel-based servers racked up some amazing numbers in the first quarter of 2000.

According to numbers from IDC (www.idc.com), sales of rack-optimized standard Intel architecture servers (SIAS) grew 55.2 percent in the first quarter of this year, compared to the fourth quarter of last year. That compares to a 2 percent decline in the overall market for SIAS.

IDC analysts believe the growth trend for rack-mountable servers has a long shelf life. In 1999, fewer than 94,000 rack-optimized servers sold. By 2004, IDC expects U.S. rack-optimized SIAS shipments to surge past 700,000.

"To date, 2000 has been the year of the thin system in the standard Intel architecture server space," said Mark Melenovsky, research manager for IDC’s Commercial Systems and Servers program. "The explosion of Internet-related businesses and services has propagated a rapid evolution of the SIAS form factor, and dense, rack-optimized servers are emerging as one of the strongest segments of growth in the server space." – Ted Williams

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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