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Intel Doubles Router Bandwidth Capacity

Intel Corp. released a router that doubles the bandwidth capacity of current DSL technology. The Intel Express 9545 delivers 1.5 megabit per second, or T1 line speed, over a single pair of copper wires and reaches distances of more than two miles, twice the length of current DSL technology.

The 9545 is based on the new American National Standards Institute (ANSI) High Speed Digital Subscriber Line standard, designed to enhance Internet or private network access speed. The product combines a router and a Channel Service Unit/Data Service Unit (CSU/DSU) into one device, simplifying installation. It also includes optional remote console capabilities, which enables complete remote configuration and management for service providers.

Intel also announced a firmware upgrade, version 4.2, for all of its 8200 and 9500 routers. The firmware includes digital subscriber line support for "always-on" Internet connectivity, an integrated firewall for a more secure environment, and optional Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing protocol to enhance performance for larger networks.

Contact Intel, www.intel.com.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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