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Microsoft Makes Certification Tougher

Perhaps in response to the ever growing population of "paper MCSEs," Microsoft Corp. announced today that its certification testing for Windiws 2000 will be more rigorous than it was for Windows NT.

Microsoft (www.microsoft.com) says the MCSE Windows 2000 credential includes testing for real-world skills. Testers have to know how to design, develop and manage Windows 2000 applications, as well as prove their skills via hands-on experience.

"The people who become certified on Windows 2000 will be the cream of the crop," said Donna Senko, Microsoft’s director of certification and skills assessment in a statement. "This credential is going to have high value in the marketplace."

Microsoft began offering limited beta editions of the new exams in April, and expects to broadly release live versions later this year. Microsoft plans to retire the Windows NT 4.0 exams by the end of this year, but MCSEs and other technology professionals will have until December 31, 2001 to retake the tests and retain their certification. Thomas Sullivan

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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