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Unisys Shows ES7000 to Government

Unisys Corp. demonstrated its Unisys [email protected] Enterprise Server ES700 to the federal government sector at the Federal Office Systems Expo (FOSE) in Washington, D.C. According to Unisys, the ES7000 combines the cost-effectiveness of Microsoft Windows network systems with the stability once found only on massive Unix servers and mainframes.

The ES7000 has the ability to run multiple deployments of Windows NT, 2000, and UnixWare in the same system, suiting it to a role as consolidator of several smaller servers and reducing the total cost of ownership (TCO).

A recent Gartner Group study showed the ES7000 to have the lowest TCO among Windows 2000 servers.

The ES7000 is based on Unisys' Cellular MultiProcessing (CMP) architecture. It supports up to 32 Intel Pentium III Xeon processors, which will be upgradable to IA-64 Itanium processors when that technology becomes available. The partitioning capabilities of the ES7000 allow administrators to create "servers within a server", executing multiple functions in different operating environments within the same system. The server also features easily interchangeable memory, processors, and I/O channels.

Contact Unisys, www.unisys.com.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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