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Lionbridge Expands Windows 2000 Logo Testing to 4th Veritest Lab

Lionbridge Technologies Inc. (www.lionbridge.com) expanded its Windows 2000 application certification testing to a fourth Veritest lab today in an effort to open the process to more international software developers.

Lionbridge’s Veritest unit is the sole authorized provider of certification testing for Windows 2000 worldwide. With Windows 2000, Microsoft Corp. (www.microsoft.com) set far more stringent requirements for applications to get a certified logo than it had set with Windows NT.

The new Windows 2000 certification testing will take place at the Veritest Labs in Ballina, Ireland. The Irish lab joins Veritest labs conducting Windows 2000 tests in Los Angeles, Paris, and Tokyo.

“Because 50 percent of worldwide software sales occur outside the United States, Lionbridge is working closely with international developers to help ensure that their applications are optimized for the Microsoft Windows 2000 family of operating systems,” Lionbridge CEO Rory Cowan said in a statement.

Thus far, Veritest has certified about 40 applications for Windows 2000 Professional and Windows 2000 Server. Microsoft officials have said they hope to have about 100 applications certified for the operating system by June. – Scott Bekker

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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