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Intel: 1-GHz Pentium III is Here

Things are heating up in the race to 1 gigahertz.

Last week, several OEMs announced plans to release 1-GHz Pentium III-based consumer PCs at the end of this month, only to be trumped on Monday by AMD's announcement that PCs with its 1-GHz AMD (www.amd.com) Athlon processor would ship this week. Now Intel Corp. (www.intel.com) has continued the fray with today's announcement of the release of its 1-GHz Pentium III processor.

The Pentium III 1-GHz is Pentium's fastest processor to date. It achieved a SPECint2000 benchmark rating of 410 and a SPECfp2000 result of 284, versus 355 and 256 scores for the Pentium III 800 MHz.

At last month's Intel Developer's Forum, Intel showed Production Level PCs featuring the 1-GHz Pentium III processor. At that time, Intel demonstrated not only the 1-GHz chip but also plans for its successor, code-named Willamette -- said to be a 1.5 GHz processor.

The 1-GHz Pentium III is currently available in limited quantities and is being offered by leading OEMs in their high-end consumer systems. -- Isaac Slepner

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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