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Visio Products Available Through Microsoft

The final move in Microsoft Corp.'s acquisition of Visio Corp. came when Microsoft announced that all Visio products and volume licensing agreements are now available through existing Microsoft sales channels.

The Visio (www.visio.com) products will be sold as standalone applications and will be known as Microsoft (www.microsoft.com) Visio 2000 Standard, Technical, Professional, and Enterprise editions.

Visio's products specialize in business diagramming - charts, graphs, and schematics. Files created with Visio products can be dropped into Microsoft PowerPoint, Excel, and Word for editing.

The Microsoft Visio 2000 products are separate from, but complement, the Microsoft Office family. Initially, they will have stickers identifying them as Microsoft Visio products, but will ship in the existing Visio packaging. Future editions will ship in Microsoft packaging and will include Microsoft product branding enhancements.

The acquisition of Visio was completed on January 7. The Visio division is part of the Microsoft Business Productivity Group. - Isaac Slepner

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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