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Unisys Posts Windows-record TPCC Results with Datacenter Server

Unisys Corp. shattered previous single-server TPCC benchmark results on the Windows platform this week with an eight-way system running beta versions of Windows 2000 Datacenter Server and SQL Server 2000.

A Unisys SMP server, the e-action Enterprise Server ES5085R, with eight 550 MHz processors achieved 48,767.77 transactions per minute (tpmC) at a cost per transaction of $20.13.

The result represents about a 20 percent improvement over the best single-machine result using Windows NT 4.0 Server, Enterprise Edition on similar hardware.

The performance approaches the fastest published results for a Unix/RISC eight-processor server at about a third the cost per tpmC -- 49,306 tpmC and $56.67/tpmC.

The Transaction Processing Performance Council (www.tpc.org) benchmark measures OLTP performance.

Also this week, Compaq Computer Corp. posted a clustered result using Windows NT 4.0 Server, Enterprise Edition, that cracked the 100,000 tpmC barrier for the first time. The result of 101,657.17 tpmC is a slight improvement over Compaq's result of 99,274.9 late last year.

Compaq got both results using six eight-way ProLiant servers running Oracle8i and Oracle Parallel Server. -- Scott Bekker

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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