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Greyware Offers Clock Synchronization Software

Greyware Automation Products updated its Windows NT clock synchronization software for client/server networks.

Domain Time II improves on the precision of Greyware’s previous versions of the tool so that every machine comes within milliseconds of the time source on the network. The product upgrade automatically compensates for WAN delays, downed servers, and network congestion.

The software installs remotely on Windows NT/2000 systems, and its time synchronization via HTTP feature allows synchronization through existing Web proxies.

Domain Time II includes time clients for automatically synchronizing computers running Windows 2000/NT/95/98 and Linux. It also acts as a remote function call (RFC)-compliant server for synchronizing Unix, Novell, MacOS, OS/2, or any other RFC-compliant time client.

The server component runs on Windows NT/2000 and is "domain-aware," providing redundancy and automatic failure recovery in the event of a server crash. Domain Time II is designed to cooperate with or replace the Windows 2000 internal time service to extend centralized automatic time synchronization to all systems in the network.

Domain Time II is currently available.

Contact Greyware, (972) 867-2794, www.greyware.com.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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