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Microsoft Officially Names Shiloh SQL Server 2000

After more than three months of rumors, Microsoft Corp. finally gave the official word that the next version of SQL Server, code-named Shiloh, will be called SQL Server 2000.

Along with the new moniker, SQL Server 2000, not suprisingly, will be tuned to take advantage of new features in Windows 2000 and Windows DNA 2000.

Microsoft says that SQL Server 2000, in fact, is an integral part of the Windows DNA 2000 platform for building and operating distributed Web applications as well as the next wave of Internet-based Web services.

"The ability to easily and efficiently share data, components, business processes and applications over the Internet is central to what Windows DNA 2000 delivers," says Tod Nielsen, vice president of marketing for the developer group at Microsoft.

When Shiloh ships, there will be two versions: SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition and SQL Server 2000. The enterprise edition will be designed to take advantage of up to 64 GB of RAM, up to 32 processors, and four-node failover clustering supported out of the box with Windows 2000 Data Center.

SQL Server 2000, for instance, will use the Active Directory services in Windows 2000 as a repository for configuration, location and maintenance information. Integration of Active Directory gives database applications location independence, allows developers to build distributed applications more easily, and helps database administrators work more efficiently.

Slated to ship in the second half of next year, the pending database is currently in beta testing at more than 750 sites. – Thomas Sullivan

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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