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SCSI Trade Association Adopts Standards

The SCSI Trade Association (STA, www.scsita.org) has adopted Ultra320 and Ultra640 SCSI as the official names of the next two generations of SCSI. These future versions, originally code-named Ultra4 and Ultra5 SCSI, were announced earlier this year.

Ultra320 SCSI devices will support data transfer rates of up to 320 MBps and packetization, along with double edge clocking, cyclical redundancy checking (CRC), and domain validation. These devices will be compatible with today's SCSI devices as well as with future ones.

The STA also recognized the term Ultra160 SCSI, which operates at a maximum data transfer rate of 160 MBps. Devices called Ultra160 SCSI feature double edge clocking, CRC and domain validation. Some manufacturers also offer packetization and quick arbitrate and select (QAS) in their Ultra160 SCSI devices.

Ultra3 and Ultra160 SCSI represent the most advanced generation of SCSI available today and will be available with legacy and future SCSI devices.

The SCSI Trade Association was formed in 1995 to promote the use and understanding of SCSI technology, to provide a focal point for communicating SCSI benefits, and influence the evolution of SCSI into the future.

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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