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Microsoft Working on Network and Security Tools for W2K

Microsoft Corp. is working on the developer beta of a suite of networking and security tools for Windows 2000 server operating systems, code-named Comet, according to a report by Betanews.com, a Web site that tracks beta versions of products, and products that have not been released.

The report states that Microsoft recently created the Comet Beta Web site, and that the company is expected to invite beta testers in the near future.

At this point, the suite runs only on Windows 2000 Release Candidate 1 (RC1), but the report states that its technologies will be supported by Windows 95/98 and NT 4.0.

According to the report, Comet includes clients such as The WinSock Proxy, Modem Sharing, Fax Services, as well as Microsoft’s H.323 Proxy and H.323 Gatekeeper, which enable enhancements to be made to NetMeeting and other Gatekeeper-aware applications. Comet also includes the Proxy/Cache Services, which will allow easier configuration and management via the Comet Administration Tool.

Microsoft was unavailable for comment, but the Betanews.com report speculates that the suite may not be released independently, but will run through the beta phases as a single product because that is an easier method of testing. -- Thomas Sullivan

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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