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IBM Buys Sequent

Breathing truth into weeks of rumors, IBM Corp. and Sequent Computer Systems Inc. (www.sequent.com) announced they have entered into a merger agreement.

IBM plans to begin selling Sequent's product line worldwide immediately following completion of the merger. IBM will integrate Sequent technologies into IBM products. These actions support IBM's strategy to deliver leadership solutions for e-businesses, emerging "NetGen" companies, and UNIX and NT customers, large and small.

Sequent is known for its systems based on NUMA (non-uniform memory access) architecture with a worldwide customer installed base. NUMA is advanced hardware and software that allows large numbers of processors to operate as a single system while maintaining the programming and manageability features of a small system. Sequent's systems use up to 64 Intel microprocessors -- with plans to use 256 -- for a variety of e-business related applications, including data warehousing and business intelligence.

IBM is expected to pay a total equity value of approximately $810 million. -- Thomas Sullivan

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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