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Microsoft Adds Upsizing, Integration Tools to Access 2000

Editor's Note: There was a misprint in today's edition of ENT Newsline that posted the headline as "Microsoft Adds Upsizing, Integration Tools to W2K." Please note that the new features are in Access 2000, not Windows 2000.

Microsoft Corp. announced new features in Access 2000 that make it easier for users to build Access applications as a front end to Microsoft SQL Server and new tools for upsizing existing Access applications to SQL Server 7.0.

For building Access applications, new features in Access 2000 called Access Projects, allow users to create a database application with Access on the front end and a native connection to SQL Server via OLE DB on the back end. Traditional Access wizards, such as those that provide assistance in creating Forms and Reports or importing data, have been redesigned to support this client/server environment. In addition, the Access interface now supports the creation and execution of SQL Server-stored procedures and triggers.

To help IT organizations scale existing Access applications to SQL Server, Microsoft has integrated its popular Microsoft Access Upsizing Tools directly into Access 2000. With these tools, users can port their database structure, including data, indexes, defaults and counters, and table relationships to SQL Server. For example, Access Queries convert to SQL Server Views.

These tools convert Access 97 objects into SQL Server equivalents. Users of previous versions of Access, such as Access 2.0 and Access 95, can either upgrade to Access 2000 or obtain SQL Server 7.0 and use its new Data Transformation Services to import data.

Additionally, Access users can obtain SQL Server 7.0 for a limited time promotional price of about $699. -- Thomas Sullivan

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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