News

Microsoft Beats Earnings Expectations

The folks in Redmond, Wash., don't even let Wall Street beat them. On Tuesday, Microsoft Corp. announced better-than-expected earnings for the third fiscal quarter ending in March.

With a net income of $1.92 billion and diluted earnings per share of $0.35, the software giant bested predictions by $0.03 per share and showed a 40 percent increase in earnings from the same quarter last year.

"Microsoft had solid performance across all product lines, but the brightest spots were the continued migration to Windows NT Workstation, strong demand for Office despite the impending upgrade, and the strength of our server applications. Results in Asia were also much improved," says Greg Maffei, Microsoft CFO. "However, we remain guarded about growth in 1999, given the likelihood that organizations will lock down their systems infrastructures due to year 2000 concerns."

Paul Maritz, group vice president of the developer group, says SQL Server 7.0 sales got off to a good start and that licenses of SQL Server increased more than 50 percent over the comparable quarter last year.

Revenue totaled $4.33 billion, a 15 percent increase over the $3.77 billion for the same quarter last year. Reported revenue does not include unearned revenue of $400 million related to the Microsoft Office 2000 Technology Guarantee, which will be recognized in coming quarters. Microsoft also realized investment gains of more than $350 million during the quarter. -- Brian Ploskina

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

Featured

  • Surface and ARM: Why Microsoft Shouldn't Follow Apple's Lead and Dump Intel

    Microsoft's current Surface flagship, the Surface Pro X, already runs on ARM. But as the ill-fated Surface RT showed, going all-in on ARM never did Microsoft many favors.

  • IT Security Isn't Supposed To Be Easy

    Joey explains why it's worth it to endure a little inconvenience for the long-term benefits of a password manager and multifactor authentication.

  • Microsoft Makes It Easier To Self-Provision PCs via Windows Autopilot When VPNs Are Used

    Microsoft announced this week that the Windows Autopilot service used with Microsoft Intune now supports enrolling devices, even in cases where virtual private networks (VPNs) might get in the way.

  • Most Microsoft Retail Locations To Shut Down

    Microsoft is pivoting its retail operations to focus more on online sales, a plan that would mean the closing of most physical Microsoft Store locations.

comments powered by Disqus

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.