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Trusted Systems Services, NCSA, US Air Force to Work on NT Cryptography Project

Trusted Systems Services Inc. (TSS, Urbana, Ill., www.trustedsystems.com), a computer security consulting, software and training company, announced that the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has subcontracted TSS to work on the research grant, "Software-Based Cryptography on Windows NT Platforms."

The project's goal is to determine if and how the Windows NT operating system can protect highly sensitive software cryptography.

"Windows NT is rapidly becoming a dominant operating system in the research community. This work reflects the awareness the Air Force has in the increasing popularity of Windows NT and in the possible cost savings of using COTS technology and software-based cryptography over traditional specially developed hardware components. This project should allow us to determine if software cryptography has a place in the defense world and if so under what circumstances," says Randal Butler, technical program manager at NCSA, and manager of this project.

This $1 million project is funded by a grant from the U.S. Air Force Material Command, Rome Laboratory, and extends through February 2000. The Boeing Company (Fairfax, Va.) is a subcontractor for the project. – Thomas Sullivan Staff Reporter/Reviews Editor

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

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