News

Intel, Netscape Invest in Red Hat, Linux

Red Hat Software Inc. (Research Triangle Park, N.C., www.redhat.com) announced that Intel Corp. and Netscape Communications Corp. have taken minority equity positions in the company. Red Hat is a distributor of the Linux operating system.

Venture capital firms Greylock and Benchmark Partners are taking positions in the company as well. Red Hat also announced it is establishing an Enterprise Computing Division that will offer enterprise-grade products and services to support global, mission-critical applications. "As the growing number of users demonstrates, the Linux operating system is ready for enterprise-wide applications," says Robert F. Young, president, Red Hat Software.

The announcement today, which divulged no specific financial details, was made at ISPCON Fall '98 in San Jose, Calif. The companies join Oracle Corp., Informix Software Inc., Computer Associates Int'l Inc., Sybase Inc. and IBM Corp. in investing in Red Hat.

It is unclear at the time, how this announcement will affect Intel's relationship with Microsoft Corp. and their Windows NT workstation. The prospective repercussions could decide the future of Intel and the way they deal with operating systems, software and the companies who design them.

The advantages for Netscape and Intel are more obvious. The companies will be able to strengthen their tools for Web developers who use or want to use the Linux platform.

International Data Corp. (IDC, Framingham, Mass.) estimates between 7.5 million and 10 million copies of Linux are in use world-wide. IDC expects sales from the two top commercial Linux firms, Red Hat and Caldera Systems Inc. (Orem, Utah, www.caldera.com), to increase by 43 percent this year.

Linux is a free, fully functional Unix workstation for applications ranging from Internet servers to work group computing. The operating system was originally created in 1991 by then-college student Linus Torvalds. Today, the core product and enhancements, including all source code, are freely available on the Internet under a GPL license. Red Hat distributes their own version of the technology for $50. -- Brian Ploskina, Assistant Editor

About the Author

Scott Bekker is editor in chief of Redmond Channel Partner magazine.

Featured

  • Microsoft Previews Windows VM Authentications via Azure Active Directory

    Microsoft on Thursday announced a preview of remote authentications into Windows-based Azure virtual machines (VMs) using Azure AD credentials.

  • Windows Server 20H1 Getting Smaller Containers and Faster PowerShell

    Microsoft is promising to deliver a smaller container size and improved PowerShell performance with its next release of Windows Server.

  • Microsoft Previews Microsoft Teams for Linux

    Microsoft on Tuesday announced a "limited preview" release of Microsoft Teams for certain Linux desktop operating systems.

  • Hyper-V Architecture: Some Clarifications

    Brien answers two thought-provoking reader questions. First, do Hyper-V VMs have direct hardware access? And second, how is it possible to monitor VM resource consumption from the host operating system?

comments powered by Disqus

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.