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Help for PST Disorder

PST (personal storage table) files are either a godsend or a curse. On the positive side, messages can be saved on end-users PCs without clogging corporate servers. This gives end users more control and they don't have to be backed up umpteen times (or if you buy into EMC's approach, umpteen times two).

There are two downsides. Locally stored files don't meet today's compliance standards and it can be a real bear dealing with .PST files.

As au aside, I once got a ZIP .PST file from an IT author. I didn't know off the bat how to use it and asked him for advice. This guy, who trust me is a big time expert, knew how to create a .PST but not how to use it.

Another problem? Finding mail stuck in some .PST files. Here is Microsoft's latest crutch. PST Capture works with your MailboximportRequest cmdlet (so now the language of IT is as obscure and protected as that of lawyers and politicians) and helps IT find files that should be easily found in the first place.

This is all great for IT pros that have the specialized knowledge to make this work, but doesn't this all still sound like a kludge? Wouldn't it be better for IT to drive real innovation, rather than fighting with a MailboximportRequest cmdlet just to get the CEO's personal mail back?

And are compliance rules preventing another economic meltdown or preventing businesses from truly prospering? Let it fly at dbarney@redmondmag.com and see your opinions (first name only) posted ASAP!

Posted by Doug Barney on 02/03/2012 at 1:19 PM


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