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Doug's Mailbag: Defending Zune

After Doug took a jab at Microsoft's media player, readers chimed in with their support for the hardware and software:

I play music on my phone using the Zune player.
Sent from my Windows Phone.
-Anonymous

I have a 120 GB Zune and love it. It has around 10,000 songs, pictures and movies. I prefer it over a smartphone 'cause I believe a mobile phone is for making calls -- not hearing music. The space is limited for storage, and a mobile phone has a life of two years in average. A player last longer. Also if you use too much your phone for multimedia purposes, when it comes to make a call, you won't have enough battery for that primary purpose. That's my opinion.
-Jorge

Interesting...I am probably one of the few people in the world who own a Zune. I've never been able to share music wireless with my friends. They all have iPods.  Don't really play music on my phone.  Need the battery power for apps.
-Anonymous

Share your thoughts with the editors of this newsletter! Write to dbarney@redmondmag.com. Letters printed in this newsletter may be edited for length and clarity, and will be credited by first name only (we do NOT print last names or e-mail addresses).

Posted by Doug Barney on 12/12/2011 at 1:18 PM


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