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Servers ARMed but not Dangerous

Data center efficiency, or green computing, is a must for large power-sucking shops. That is driving virtualization, the cloud, better cable, cooling and even some shops setting up centers in cold climates (and caves).

ARM also has an answer: It is pushing for its processors to be used to drive more and more servers.

The company is now working on a 64-bit edition of its 32-bit processor, with test chips expected in about three years. This is about the same gestation period as a frilled shark.
Despite the wait, the results could be dramatic.

ARM partners are already bragging about efficiency. Calxeda claims it is building a system-on-a-chip that uses 1.5 watts. Intel's Atom, used on a lot of netbooks, uses way more power at 22 watts.

A four-core Calxeda will use 3.8 watts, while it takes almost 35 watts to drive an Intel dual-core Xeon.

One problem? Microsoft has not committed to porting Windows Server 8 to ARM. This leaves ARM servers chugging along with Linux and Unix.

Are you open to a new server architecture? Yes or no's equally accepted at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

Posted by Doug Barney on 11/14/2011 at 1:18 PM


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