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Doug's Mailbag: Browser Musings

Two readers chime in with their thoughts on the Internet browser landscape:

In your story 'Google/Firefox Graphics Ain't No Good,' Microsoft claims Chrome is less secure than IE. This is pure unadulterated BS! As you've reported yourself, every year the hacking community hosts a competition (the name escapes me) to determine who can compromise a system using the leading browsers as attack vectors. Chrome has yet to be compromised AT ALL by any of the hacking groups. IE fell prey to their exploits is less than 10 minutes.

What's that saying about rocks and glass houses?
-John

I think the browser wars are over and really have been for some time. I mean browsers are a commodity. They all are about the same -- when one browser comes out with something cool, the others soon add the same or similar functionality into it. I think it's funny that people seem to get into holy wars over a browser or any other software/technology. Just pick the one you like and use it. If someone likes something else, great, this is what freedom is all about.
-Craig

Share your thoughts with the editors of this newsletter! Write to dbarney@redmondmag.com. Letters printed in this newsletter may be edited for length and clarity, and will be credited by first name only (we do NOT print last names or e-mail addresses).

 

Posted by Doug Barney on 07/08/2011 at 1:18 PM


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