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Google/Firefox Graphics Ain't No Good

Microsoft software is the largest vector for attack ever presented to hackers. The sheer size of the software footprint and the insanely huge user base make it so. Other bits of ubiquitous software such as Adobe Flash are also constantly attacked with new holes found faster than a farmer crossing a prairie dog field.

So I have mixed feelings when Microsoft argues that someone else's software is holier than Billy Graham.

According to Redmond, Khronos' WebGL graphics, used by Firefox and Google Chrome browsers, is a swinging open door with a lighted sign for hackers to enter. Microsoft, not anxious to support the graphics standard that it didn't create, claims it is too easy for hackers to crack WebGL and take over our precious computers. Isn't that the basis of every RCE every waged against Windows, IE or Office?

WebGL is designed to offer 3D and high-res graphics. Could it be that Microsoft simply wants developers to write to IE 9's HTML 5 or SilverLight? I'm waiting for Jesse Ventura to get to the bottom of this conspiracy.

Whom do you believe? Vote at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

Posted by Doug Barney on 06/22/2011 at 1:18 PM


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