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You Win 7, You Lose 7

I was never a fan of XP. Performance degraded, stability floundered and reinstalls were the only solution after prolonged use.

I was initially a fan of Windows 7, until performance degraded, stability floundered and a reinstall were the only solution (in truth, the reinstall was due to a virus). And three of my printers that worked fine with XP are dead in the water with Win 7.

Win 7 is still far better. But for me, the blush is off the rose.

Maybe my experience and those of others are filtering back to IT, many of whom are forestalling Win 7 migrations. Fact is, over half of shops haven't move a muscle in Win 7's direction, according to a new report from Unisys. According to the report, little more than 20 percent are making the move, with the remainder (about a quarter)  running pilots.

I get this. IT spent years getting its arms around XP, and while it breaks about as much as a Yugo, IT knows how to fix it.

And spending well needed cash on app upgrades and new peripherals is about as popular as a meal of garlic and red onions in a stuck elevator.

What is your Win 7 plan? Say it, don't spray it at [email protected]

Posted by Doug Barney on 04/29/2011 at 1:18 PM


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