Barney's Blog

Blog archive

Microsoft Early and Late to the Tablet Party

Two decades before Steve Jobs even thought of the word iPad, Microsoft was working on what was then called Pen Computing. In fact, Microsoft Pen Computing effort is one year away from being able to drink legally. (Although it is old enough to go to war. Go figure!)

That's why it is so odd that Microsoft, arguably the tablet inventor, is seen as so far behind the eight ball.

I think it is because Microsoft has always had a thick client mentality. And thick clients do not a good tablet make.

Microsoft may be repeating this mistake with a new breed of tablets expected next year. Apple was roundly criticized for not basing the iPad on the MacOS. It turns out Apple was right -- light is better.

The new Windows tablets won't be based on Windows Phone 7 (the iPad is based on the OS that drives iPods and the iPhone) but Windows 8. I've had Windows 7 flake out enough on me to know this is a bad idea. I can't see Windows 8 solving all of the problems caused by Windows.

But you know, Microsoft doesn't have to win every war. What's wrong with Apple and Android owning the tablet market? You tell me at [email protected]

Posted by Doug Barney on 03/07/2011 at 1:18 PM


Featured

  • Microsoft Starting To Roll Out New Excel Connected Data Types

    Microsoft on Thursday announced some Excel and Power BI enhancements that add "connected data types" on top of the standard strings and numbers options.

  • Windows 10 Users Getting New Process for Finding Optional Driver Updates

    Accessing Windows 10 drivers classified as "optional updates" will be more of a manual seek-and-install type of experience, starting on Nov. 5, 2020, Microsoft explained in a Wednesday announcement.

  • Microsoft Changes Privacy Platform Name to SmartNoise

    Microsoft Research has changed the name of its "differential privacy" platform from "WhiteNoise" to "SmartNoise," according to a Wednesday announcement.

  • Why Restarting a Failed SCVMM Job Might Be a Bad Idea

    Occasionally, restarting a failed System Center Virtual Machine Manager job can leave your virtualization infrastructure in an unknown state. Here's how to avoid that.

comments powered by Disqus