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Microsoft Early and Late to the Tablet Party

Two decades before Steve Jobs even thought of the word iPad, Microsoft was working on what was then called Pen Computing. In fact, Microsoft Pen Computing effort is one year away from being able to drink legally. (Although it is old enough to go to war. Go figure!)

That's why it is so odd that Microsoft, arguably the tablet inventor, is seen as so far behind the eight ball.

I think it is because Microsoft has always had a thick client mentality. And thick clients do not a good tablet make.

Microsoft may be repeating this mistake with a new breed of tablets expected next year. Apple was roundly criticized for not basing the iPad on the MacOS. It turns out Apple was right -- light is better.

The new Windows tablets won't be based on Windows Phone 7 (the iPad is based on the OS that drives iPods and the iPhone) but Windows 8. I've had Windows 7 flake out enough on me to know this is a bad idea. I can't see Windows 8 solving all of the problems caused by Windows.

But you know, Microsoft doesn't have to win every war. What's wrong with Apple and Android owning the tablet market? You tell me at dbarney@redmondmag.com.

Posted by Doug Barney on 03/07/2011 at 1:18 PM


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