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New Windows Servers for Home and SMB Nears

I've generally heard good things about both Windows Small Business Server (SBS) and Windows Home Server.

I hear from customers that it is pretty easy to set up and operate, and pretty comprehensive. The only real complaint was when you ran out of capacity it can be hard to add more SBS servers and integrate them with what you've got.

On the Home Server front, many of you have sung its praises, using it for backup and as a common file store. If you are out and about or using different machines, you can always get to your data.

Now these two beauties are being tweaked. Windows Small Business Server Essentials 2011 just entered release candidate status, meaning it is basically done, barring any crazy last-minute glitches.

Windows Home Server 2011, formerly code-named 'Vail,' is also now a release candidate. Expect both when the snow thaws -- if it manages to actually thaw by spring.

Neither is really enterprise-worthy, unless you are talking remote offices or small departments. Home Server supports up to 10 users, barely enough for the average Irish family, and SBS 2011 can only handle 25 users, so when they say small business they mean small business.

What is your experience with either? Reports welcome at [email protected]

Posted by Doug Barney on 02/07/2011 at 1:18 PM


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