News

Microsoft Releases Virtual Machine Converter 3.0

Microsoft's Virtual Machine Converter (MVMC )3.0, made available for download Monday, has brought back the ability to do physical-to-virtual (P2V) conversions. Microsoft brought back the feature after strong customer reaction when that capability was pulled from version 2.

When it released version 2 in April, P2V was dropped in favor of virtual-to-virtual (V2V)-only conversions. Although version 2 added a lot of features, like support for support for VMware vCenter and ESXi version 5.5, along with expanded Linux guest OS support and a PowerShell interface, what Microsoft took away may have been noticed more than what was added.

Physical servers that can be converted as part of the P2V process go back as far as Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, and Windows Vista on the client side.

MVMC 3.0 is a stand-alone tool that Microsoft touts as a way to convert VMware virtual machines (VMs) to Hyper-V hosts. It converts virtual disks that are attached to a VMware virtual machine to virtual hard disks (VHDs) that can be uploaded to Microsoft Azure. It can convert VMware VMs back to vSphere 4.1.

About the Author

Keith Ward is the editor in chief of Virtualization & Cloud Review. Follow him on Twitter @VirtReviewKeith.

Featured

  • Windows Admin Center vs. Hyper-V Manager: What's Better for Managing VMs?

    Microsoft's preferred interface for Windows Server is Windows Admin Center, but can it really replace Hyper-V Manager for managing virtual machines? Brien compares the two management tools.

  • Microsoft Offers More Help on Windows Server 2008 Upgrades

    Microsoft this week published additional help resources for organizations stuck on Windows Server 2008, which fell out of support on Jan. 14.

  • Microsoft Ups Its Carbon Reduction Goals

    Microsoft on Thursday announced a corporatewide carbon reduction effort that aims to make the company "carbon negative" by 2030.

  • How To Dynamically Lock Down an Unattended Windows 10 PC

    One of the biggest security risks in any organization happens when a user walks away from their PC without logging out. Microsoft has the solution (and it's not a password-protected screensaver).

comments powered by Disqus

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.