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Microsoft Names New Corporate CFO

Microsoft's new corporate chief financial officer is Amy Hood, effective immediately.

Hood most recently served as the chief financial officer of Microsoft's Business Division, but now becomes the company's overall CFO. She is replacing Peter Klein, an 11-year Microsoft veteran. Microsoft announced Klein's departure last month, during its third-quarter earnings call. Klein will remain at the company through June to help with the transition process, according to Microsoft's Wednesday announcement.

Hood's appointment puts to rest recent speculation that the CFO race would come down between Hood and Tami Reller, the current CFO of Microsoft's Windows Division. Hood will be Microsoft's first female CFO.

Hood served as CFO of Microsoft's $24 billion Business Division since 2010. The group comprises several major Microsoft products, including Office, Office 365, Dynamics, Exchange and SharePoint. As CFO of that division, Hood oversaw the launch of Office 365, as well as two of Microsoft's most significant acquisitions -- Skype, valued at $8.5 billion, and Yammer, valued at $1.2 billion. Hood joined Microsoft in 2002.

"Amy brings the right talents and experiences to the role as we continue to strengthen our focus on devices and services," said Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, echoing his assertion from last year that Microsoft was transitioning from being a purely software-focused company. "She has been an instrumental leader in the Microsoft Business Division (MBD), helping lead the transition to services with Office 365 and delivering strong financial and operational management throughout her time on the business."

About the Author

Gladys Rama is the senior site producer for Redmondmag.com, RCPmag.com and MCPmag.com.

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