Security Advisor

Do You Know Who Has Admin Rights?

Looking to a somewhat biased study, more than half of you don't.

According to a survey of 600 security pros, 68 percent of you don't.

While the survey was conducted by Viewfinity, a company that sells privilege management software, and its results could be seen as its way of pushing its products onto you, the results, nonetheless, are worth a look.

The study also found that 20 percent of respondents said that up to 30 percent of employees had admin rights on server machines. If indicative of the real world (reminder, this is a survey conducted to sell its products), that is a scary thought that the power to do so much harm is in the hands of so many.

"One of the most popular ways to infiltrate servers is to exploit administrative rights on endpoints and, through that path, get into a position that allows for an attack on the vital part of the enterprise infrastructure,”"said Leonid Shtilman, CEO at Viewfinity. "Companies wouldn't go without antivirus -- so why would they give administrative rights to users when there is a way for properly managing privileges without exposing the company to unnecessary security risks?"

So what say you? Do you keep tabs on who holds onto the digital skeleton key in your enterprise? Do you use any privilege management solutions? Send me your thoughts at cpaoli@1105media.com or leave a comment below.

 

About the Author

Chris Paoli is the site producer for Redmondmag.com and MCPmag.com.

Featured

  • Microsoft Offers More Help on Windows Server 2008 Upgrades

    Microsoft this week published additional help resources for organizations stuck on Windows Server 2008, which fell out of support on Jan. 14.

  • Microsoft Ups Its Carbon Reduction Goals

    Microsoft on Thursday announced a corporatewide carbon reduction effort that aims to make the company "carbon negative" by 2030.

  • How To Dynamically Lock Down an Unattended Windows 10 PC

    One of the biggest security risks in any organization happens when a user walks away from their PC without logging out. Microsoft has the solution (and it's not a password-protected screensaver).

  • First Stable Chromium-Based Microsoft Edge Browser Released

    Microsoft on Wednesday announced the first release of its Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser at the "stable" commercial-release stage.

comments powered by Disqus

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.