Security Advisor

Is Privacy Completely Dead?

Besides writing duties for this blog, one of my tasks is to go through the comments on RedmondMag.com and its sister sites to weed out the pertinent conversations from those wanting to sell readers knockoff Prada bags and an incredible 80 percent discount.

One caught my eye that was discussing the idea of privacy now that we live in the age of the Internet:

"I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that there is no way short of leaving the Internet in its entirety that anyone can hope to reclaim some semblance of privacy as we once knew it. And even then, the person leaving the Internet has left footprints all over the virtual veldt.

"The Internet is a network of networks. People who are interested in gathering intelligence on their fellow human beings have all the interconnectedness they need to hunt down that sort of information. And we, the Internet users, are all too willing to share it in order to have access to the services that the first group provides as an incentive to get that information they crave. Add to that automated daemons that scour the 'Net for information of interest, and massive database engines that collect, collate and corroborate all the myriad bits and bytes, and you have the greatest privacy destruction engine the world has ever seen. And if you're interested in your privacy, don't expect the government of our nation states to come to your rescue -- it's in its best interest to be able to accumulate as much information on its citizens as it can in order to facilitate social cohesion and stability.

"Does this sound too cynical? Too cut and dried? Really? When the UK is becoming a surveillance society, when we have Congress considering CISPA, when we have Facebook hoovering up information daily by the terabyte, is this really anything more than a précis of the true situation? Privacy as we knew it died a long time ago; we're now arguing about its dried-out corpse. Pandora's box was opened; the demons have multiplied, and even a bigger box is not going to retrieve them." -- Den

Does Den have it right? Can we not go back to a simpler, more private existence due to the Internet? Does the access of information come with the cost of privacy? Let me know what you think at cpaoli@1105media.com.

About the Author

Chris Paoli is the site producer for Redmondmag.com and MCPmag.com.

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