Security Advisor

U.S. Drops Down on the 'Dirty Dozen' Spam List

For the first time since security firm Sophos has been studying spam, the U.S. is finally not the head of its "dirty dozen" for junk e-mail origination. That (dis)honor now goes to India, where about 1 in 10 unwanted e-mail comes from.

The U.S. drops to second with 8.7 percent of all worldwide spam, and South Korea wins bronze with its 5.7 percent share.

Sophos also found that an alarming 80 percent of spammers don't even know they're involved. They're sending out large amounts of trash, thanks to the work of hijacking hackers.

A glimmer of good news in Sophos' largely negative report is that worldwide spam is down. Hooray! That's because spammers are finding more success getting to you through social networking sites. Boo!

About the Author

Chris Paoli is the site producer for Redmondmag.com and MCPmag.com.

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