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Fix for Critical Flash Flaw

Adobe acted to address a zero-day vulnerability in its Flash Player 10 and lower versions by issuing a a "critical" patch on Wednesday.

Left unpatched, this vulnerability could lead to system crashes or permit an attacker to gain control over a system. The company, in its security bulletin, said the patch also fixes several other flaws. There have been reports that one of the vulnerabilities, CVE-2011-2444, "is being exploited in the wild in active, targeted attacks designed to trick the user into clicking on a malicious link delivered in an e-mail message," Adobe said.

"This universal cross-site scripting issue could be used to take actions on a user's behalf on any website or webmail provider if the user visits a malicious website," the bulletin said.

The vulnerabilities apply to versions of Flash Player 10.3.183.7 and earlier for Windows, Macintosh, Linux and Solaris operating systems, the company said. Adobe recommends that users of those versions of Flash upgrade to Version 10.3.183.10, and that users of Flash for Android 10.3.186.6 upgrade to the next version, 10.3.186.7. 

The security bulletin comes a week after Adobe released 13 Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures advisories as part of its regular monthly update.

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