News

DHS To Hire 170 IT Employees During Next 18 Months

The Homeland Security Department is on track to nearly double its information technology workforce during the next 18 months, to about 350 employees, as it seeks to improve coordination among its 22 agencies, DHS Chief Information Officer Richard Spires said today.

The department now has about 180 IT employees, up from 100 IT workers last year, Spires said at a breakfast meeting hosted by the AFCEA's Bethesda, Md. chapter .

By Oct. 1, Spires said he expects a roster of about 220, and by Oct. 1, 2011, he anticipates having about 350 employees.

Currently, about 700 contractor IT workers assist the government staff, and Spires said he is examining the mix to ensure the right skills are on staff. He declined to say how far he might reduce the contracting support work.

"We need technology expertise within the government, including systems engineering and program management skills," Spires said. "When we get up to 350 to 400 employees in the next several years, it will change the dynamic."

DHS has been modernizing its infrastructure and consolidating its data centers, among other IT projects and the goal is to reduce from 24 data centers to two. Five centers have closed, and six more are on schedule to shut down this year, Spires said.

With the completion of the first Quadrennial Homeland Security Review, which identifies five key mission areas of the department, Spires said he is focused on developing and managing the hundreds of IT systems supporting those "diverse, but interrelated" missions.

"All of DHS' five mission areas cross boundaries," Spires said. "How do we get better at cross-organizational cooperation? I think we have to look hard at governance."

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer for 1105 Media's Washington Technology.

Featured

  • Spaceflight Training in the Middle of a Pandemic

    Surprisingly, the worldwide COVID-19 lockdown has hardly slowed down the space training process for Brien. In fact, it has accelerated it.

  • Surface and ARM: Why Microsoft Shouldn't Follow Apple's Lead and Dump Intel

    Microsoft's current Surface flagship, the Surface Pro X, already runs on ARM. But as the ill-fated Surface RT showed, going all-in on ARM never did Microsoft many favors.

  • IT Security Isn't Supposed To Be Easy

    Joey explains why it's worth it to endure a little inconvenience for the long-term benefits of a password manager and multifactor authentication.

  • Microsoft Makes It Easier To Self-Provision PCs via Windows Autopilot When VPNs Are Used

    Microsoft announced this week that the Windows Autopilot service used with Microsoft Intune now supports enrolling devices, even in cases where virtual private networks (VPNs) might get in the way.

comments powered by Disqus

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.