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Microsoft Security Director Steps Down

Redmond's security team is undergoing a revamp with the announcement that Andrew Cushman, director of Microsoft's Security Response Center (MSRC), will be stepping down to be replaced by group manager Mike Reavey.

Reavey's appointment, announced late Thursday, might be a sign that Microsoft is trying to step up its security push at a time when its patching process is facing increased scrutiny because of more pervasive threats.

Well-respected by both security experts and the hacker community, Reavey comes into the position after being a group manager specializing in emerging threats and vulnerability response, which includes Microsoft's monthly security bulletins.

Particularly with the threat of the Conficker worm still looming, Reavey seems to be just the man for the job. Over the years, he was instrumental in combating the Zotob, Sasser and Blaster worm outbreaks on Windows systems, and many consider him to be the face of the MSRC.

According to Microsoft, though Cushman is being replaced, he is not leaving the company. Instead, he will focus on developing ideas and strategies for Microsoft's larger, more collaborative security initiatives. Both Cushman and Reavey will continue to report to George Stathakopoulos, Microsoft's general manager of security engineering and communications.

About the Author

Jabulani Leffall is an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in the Financial Times of London, Investor's Business Daily, The Economist and CFO Magazine, among others.

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