News

Microsoft's DNS Fix Leads to More Problems

The blogosphere is awash with talk about the possible overall weakness of the Domain Name System (DNS) architecture.

The blogosphere is awash with talk about the possible overall weakness of the Domain Name System (DNS) architecture. For its part, Microsoft's released a DNS fix in its patch slate for July, but Redmond seems to have problems just getting it to end users. Moreover, some users of the DNS fix have experienced additional difficulties.

So far, since Microsoft's DNS fix was issued on July 10, there have been two separate problems associated with its installation.

The software giant disclosed last week, in a technical posting on its SBS services blog, that some users experienced interruptions in the Exchange Server services component of application stacks sitting on various Windows operating systems.

"Some customers have reported seeing random problems with services after installing MS08-037," the blog stated. MS08-037 is Microsoft's fix designed to stave off DNS cache exploits. Hackers can use this vulnerability to increase their chances of redirecting an unsuspecting user to a malicious Web site.

The blog indicated that notifications for Active Sync -- Microsoft's solution for synchronizing a mobile device with either a PC or server hardware running Exchange -- were failing. Also, Internet Protocol Security (IPsec) services and Internet Authentication Services (IAS) were failing to start.

Reached early Tuesday for comment, Microsoft would only confirm that this issue is separate from another glitch announced on July 10 -- an interoperability snafu associated with the ZoneAlarm security application made by Check Point Software Technologies. In response to the glitch, Check Point provided updates for all of its ZoneAlarm products.

Tyler Reguly, a security engineer for San Francisco-based nCircle, commented that Microsoft should be more transparent about issues like those outlined in the SBS services blog. Such descriptions went relatively under the radar, and could be considered highly technical, bordering on vague.

"It may take users quite a while to diagnose the problem and then they have to find this specific blog post," he said. "Microsoft should really be doing more to make people aware of the issue. The impact isn't as great as the recent WSUS issue, but this should be handled in the same way that was. It should be given its own KB number and a security advisory should be released, especially given that IPsec is potentially affected."

About the Author

Jabulani Leffall is an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in the Financial Times of London, Investor's Business Daily, The Economist and CFO Magazine, among others.

Featured

  • RAMBleed Side-Channel Attack Method Disclosed by Researchers

    Academic researchers this week published information about another side-channel attack method, called "RAMBleed," that can expose information from memory chips, including encryption key information.

  • Penguin

    Windows 10 Preview Build 18917 Shows Off New Linux Integration

    Microsoft's latest Windows 10 "fast-ring" preview release is showcasing a coming Delivery Optimization enhancement, along with the ability to try the newly emerged Windows Subsystem for Linux version 2.

  • Customizing Microsoft Office 365

    While the overall look and feel of Office 365 is pretty standard across organizations, there are several ways to personalize it and make it fit better with your company's specific needs.

  • Microsoft 365 Business Tenants Getting Conditional Access and Trouble-Ticket Features

    Microsoft added its conditional access security service to Microsoft 365 Business subscriptions, according to a Wednesday announcement, and it also added new trouble-ticket features for Microsoft 365 administrators.

comments powered by Disqus

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.