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Microsoft Issues Initial Protocol Documentation

Microsoft today released information on protocols used in some of its software products.

Microsoft today released information on protocols used in some of its software products. The release is associated with the company's interoperability principles issued in February, whereby the company pledged to offer open protocols and open APIs to help software developers create products that work with Microsoft solutions.

Microsoft claimed in a press release to have released more than 14,000 pages of what it calls "preliminary versions of technical documentation" for some of its applications. The documentation describes protocols used in Microsoft Office 2007, Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 and Microsoft Exchange Server 2007.

A Microsoft spokesperson provided a link to SharePoint preliminary protocol documentation, which is available here.

The preliminary versions of the protocol documentation will eventually be released as final versions. Microsoft's announcement outlined a three-step process to get there. First, Microsoft is posting the preliminary versions. Next, it plans gather comments on the documentation from the developer community "until June." At the end of June, Microsoft plans to post the final versions of the protocol documentation plus patent licensing terms.

"We have forums specifically designated for feedback on the specifications located on MSDN," stated the Microsoft spokesperson in an e-mail. Links to those forums are indicated at the end of Microsoft's press release.

Access to the open protocol documentation will be free, without licensing or royalty fees, but that won't be the case where patents apply. Patented protocol documentation will be priced "at low royalty rates," according to Microsoft's announcement.

About the Author

Kurt Mackie is senior news producer for 1105 Media's Converge360 group.

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