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Study: MSN Most Dangerous IM Client in 2007

MSN Messenger was the instant messaging client of choice for hackers, thieves and many types of malware in 2007.

The IM client received 45 percent of all malware threats -- more than double the amount any other service received, according to a report released yesterday by Foster City, Calif.-based security solution provider Facetime Communications.

Yahoo received 20 percent, AOL Instant Messenger received 19 percent, and all other IM networks received 15 percent combined.

The lack of security features coupled with the fact that IM programs are almost always running in the background of a computer make them extremely dangerous to a network, according to FaceTime.

"Most organizations are not willing to accept the security and compliance exposure resulting from the uncontrolled use of these applications," Frank Cabri, vice president of marketing and product management for FaceTime, said in a released statement. "IT managers need to ensure the safe use of approved applications and effectively detect and block the rogue use of unapproved applications."

About the Author

J.T. Gallant is an Endicott College student currently interning for the Redmond Media Group.

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