News

Patch Tuesday Looks Light

Microsoft's patch rollout looks to be on the light side in September, with just five patches -- one of which is labeled "Critical" and four rated "Important" -- as part of its upcoming Patch Tuesday release.

The lone critical issue, like those in previous months, has potential remote code execution (RCE) implications that affect Windows but can be remedied by a quick restart and use of Microsoft's Baseline Security Analyzer to sweep the system for bugs and determine whether the system even requires an update.

The remaining four patches are for various products and applications including Visual Studio, Windows SharePoint Server, Windows Services for Unix, MSN Messenger and Windows Live Messenger.

The security issues for the Windows-for-Unix and SharePoint notices involve "elevation of privilege," or access control risks, where unauthorized users could potentially change user rights settings. Meanwhile, it's RCE considerations for Visual Studio, MSN Messenger and Windows Live Messenger items.

Of the total five forecasted bulletins, three will require restarts.

Redmond will also release another update to the Microsoft Windows Malicious Software Removal tool, and is rolling out one high-priority, non-security update on Microsoft Update and nothing for Windows Update.

Thursday's advance notification isn't set in stone but is a pretty good indication of what to expect. Looking ahead, it seems that for security managers, next Tuesday may represent more of an opportunity for value-added fixes than urgent ones.

About the Author

Jabulani Leffall is an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in the Financial Times of London, Investor's Business Daily, The Economist and CFO Magazine, among others.

Featured

  • Spaceflight Training in the Middle of a Pandemic

    Surprisingly, the worldwide COVID-19 lockdown has hardly slowed down the space training process for Brien. In fact, it has accelerated it.

  • Surface and ARM: Why Microsoft Shouldn't Follow Apple's Lead and Dump Intel

    Microsoft's current Surface flagship, the Surface Pro X, already runs on ARM. But as the ill-fated Surface RT showed, going all-in on ARM never did Microsoft many favors.

  • IT Security Isn't Supposed To Be Easy

    Joey explains why it's worth it to endure a little inconvenience for the long-term benefits of a password manager and multifactor authentication.

  • Microsoft Makes It Easier To Self-Provision PCs via Windows Autopilot When VPNs Are Used

    Microsoft announced this week that the Windows Autopilot service used with Microsoft Intune now supports enrolling devices, even in cases where virtual private networks (VPNs) might get in the way.

comments powered by Disqus

Office 365 Watch

Sign up for our newsletter.

Terms and Privacy Policy consent

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.