Quick Review: XP Appetizer

A handy starter reference that's not for the pro


I recently had a chance to read the new Syngress book, Configuring and Troubleshooing Windows XP Professional, and here's the bottom line: If you're experienced or studying for the XP Pro test, don't consider this book your entree. I liked this book, I really did. But when I'm ready to start my all-nighters, this book won't be next to my coffee maker.

Pros: Plain language, lots of screen shots, plenty of step-by-step instructions.
Cons:
A little too simplistic for experienced IT pros.
Verdict: Entry-level IT workers, pick it up. Otherwise, save your money.

Don't misunderstand; the plain language that this book was written in, combined with the numerous screen shots and step-by-step instructions make it perfect for the novice techies to have on their reference shelves.

I'm not convinced though, that anyone with, say, five years of Windows NT/2000 experience or better doesn't know that a background is also called wallpaper, for example.

Again, please don't misunderstand me; I really did like the book. It's just that in my opinion, most super-geeks will probably want something a little bit more filling.

About the Author

Jim Idema, MCSE, CNA, is president of Idema Enterprises Computer Consulting, a West Michigan-based computer consulting firm specializing in networking solutions to business.

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