Quick Look: Run SQL Server at its Peak

Developers and administrators alike need this book.


Out of the box, SQL Server is a pretty fast product. But over time and with heavy use, it can slow down. Without regular maintenance and upkeep, querying SQL Server may be a great deal like watching paint dry: a slow and boring process. We all know what users do when something is slow and boring; they make less than amiable phone calls to the administrators and developers in an attempt to get faster access to their data. This book is designed to help you prevent those calls before they come pouring in.

Between these covers lies a great deal of technical information that you can use to accelerate your server's performance and keep it that way. There is something in here for everyone that uses SQL Server: how to measure hardware performance, what type of RAID to use (and how it works), how to index properly, how to write faster queries, and more. The only minor (very minor) drawback is that there is some light content tucked away in the book, such as chapter 5, which is all about some new features in SQL Server 2000. That aside, this book is fantastic. Whatever your role may be with SQL Server, you need this book.

About the Author

Joseph L. Jorden, MCSE, MCT, CCNA, CCDA is Chief Technical Officer for Dugger & Associates (www.Dugger-IT.com). He was one of the first 100 people to achieve the MCSE+I and one of the first 2,000 to become an MCSE under Windows 2000. Joseph frequently contributes to books from Sybex and various periodicals.

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